First In-House: Global Conference on Climate and Sustainability (GCCS) 2050

Date: Sunday, January 24, 2016

Time: Registration starts at 9:00am (more details below)

Location: Hagey Hall 138 and 139; please view the map here ------->

  • Please note that the doors to the new wing of HH will be locked so you will have to enter through the west or south side of the building.

Dress: Business Casual

Lunch will be provided.

Please bring a laptop and charger, as well as pen & paper.

Itinerary

9:00 am – 9:30am Registration
9:45am – 10:00 am Director’s Remarks
10:00 am – 1:30 pm Committee Session 1
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch and Activity
2:30 pm – 5:30 pm Committee Session 2
5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Awards and Final Remarks

 

Committee for the Effective Management of Climate Refugees (CEMCR)

Resolutions Passed

CEMCR Resolution 1

CEMCR Resolution 2

Participating Countries

AOSIS (Alliance of Small Island States)
ASEAN
Australia
Bangladesh
Canada
Chad
China
IMF
India
Indonesia
Mexico
Niger
Russia
Sudan
The African Union
The African Union
The EU
The EU
The Netherlands
The Phillippines
The Red Cross
The UK
The US
Vietnam
WHO

Committee for the Sustainable Allocation of Resources (CSAR)

Participating Countries

ASEAN
Australia
Bangladesh
Brazil
Canada
China
France
Germany
IMF
India
Indonesia
International Energy Association (IEA)
Laos
OPEC
Russia
Sudan
The African Union
The DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo)
The Netherlands
The UK
The US
The World Bank
Vietnam

Letter from the Chair

Greetings delegates, and welcome to GCCS 2050! My name is Sebastian, and I have the pleasure of being your chair for our first in-house conference of 2015.

Set in the year 2050, Global Conference on Climate and Sustainability is the result of an urgent need for countries to tackle the widespread and disruptive symptoms climate change inaction. Given the breadth and complexity of the challenges at hand, you will be split into two committees, each one dealing with an aspect of climate change and sustainability that is likely to be at the forefront of discussion by the year 2050.

The Committee for the Effective Management of Climate Fugitives (CEMCR) is designed to remedy the massive, climate-change-induced exodus of citizens from coastal countries into new regions – what has become the largest humanitarian crisis in all of history. The cause of this so-called Climate Fugitive Crisis has been the one-two punch of rising sea-levels and depleted seafood stocks, resulting in the destruction of large coastal cities and in the collapse of seafood-based economies. As the millions of citizens living in coastal countries exit their crumbling countries in search of new livelihoods, the many challenges this crisis presents – from the immediate issue of relocating these climate refugees to the long-term challenge of settling them effectively within new countries – will require all of your cooperation and creativity.

Next up is the Committee for the Sustainable Allocation of Resources (CSAR), which will tackle the much broader challenge presented by the climate crisis – that of providing the immense human population with important in a manner that is both sustainable and beneficial to all involved countries. While CEMCR deals with the pressing outcomes of our earlier failure at stemming climate change, CSAR aims right at root of the problem – a lack of economic incentive for countries to adopt environmentally sustainable policies – and at its only solution – the design of sustainable resource development practices that offer a net benefit to parties at the individual and national rungs and thus become self-sustaining. CSAR will cover various aspects of resource allocation, including sustainable agriculture, forestry, and energy production.

Given the urgency of the crisis at hand, your task will be twofold. As always, you must best represent the best interests of your respective nations and organisations. However, you must not underestimate the urgency of the climate crisis at hand, nor the opportunity for creative and self-sustaining solutions to the various facets of this crisis. This is a chance for all of you to experience the pressure of designing policies too important to fail – and the rush of satisfaction that will come when you collectively take the first step towards a future that can accommodate future generations.

So with that in mind, I commend you to bring your most resourceful ideas to the table, and I can hardly wait to solve the challenge of our generation with you next Sunday!

Sincerely,

Sebastian Meissner